Lightweight, modular RPC framework
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Arsen Musayelyan 7592eae318
Handle requests concurrently
2 months ago
client Marshal/Unmarshal arguments and return values separately to allow struct tags to take effect for each codec 2 months ago
codec Marshal/Unmarshal arguments and return values separately to allow struct tags to take effect for each codec 2 months ago
examples Propagate context to requests 5 months ago
internal/types Remove now useless internal/reflectutil 2 months ago
server Handle requests concurrently 2 months ago
.gitignore Add web client 4 months ago
LICENSE Initial Commit 5 months ago
README.md Mention web client in README 4 months ago
go.mod Set module go version to 1.17 5 months ago
go.sum Add WebSocket server support 5 months ago
lrpc_test.go Handle requests concurrently 2 months ago

README.md

lrpc

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A lightweight RPC framework that aims to be as easy to use as possible, while also being as lightweight as possible. Most current RPC frameworks are bloated to the point of adding 7MB to my binary, like RPCX. That is what prompted me to create this.


Channels

This RPC framework supports creating channels to transfer data from server to client. My use-case for this is to implement watch functions and transfer progress in ITD, but it can be useful for many things.


Codec

When creating a server or client, a CodecFunc can be provided. An io.ReadWriter is passed into the CodecFunc and it returns a Codec, which is an interface that contains encode and decode functions with the same signature as json.Decoder.Decode() and json.Encoder.Encode().

This allows any codec to be used for the transfer of the data, making it easy to create clients in different languages.


Web Client

Inside client/web, there is a web client for lrpc using WebSockets. It is written in ruby (I don't like JS) and translated to human-readable JS using Ruby2JS. With the bundler gem installed, cd into client/web and run make. This will create a new file called lrpc.js, which can be used within a browser. It uses crypto.randomUUID(), so it must be used on an https site, not http.